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Entering a Yo-Yo Tournament

If you are looking to enter a yo-yo tournament, there are a few different things that you will need to know. Whether you are new to the sport or you have competed for years, it is always helpful to know the rules of the game. The following are some helpful tips to help you make the most of your participation. First, learn the various types of routines you can do with your yo-yo.

Freestyle routines

The Scales Open V yo-yo contest features a freestyle competition for division 1A. The contest is made up of a 1 minute preliminary round and a 2 minute final round. The music players choose should be appropriate for the audience and the style of the routine. Although the LVO music guidelines are stricter than those of the Scales Open Online competition, they should be interpreted in the same light as any other yo-yo contest. Therefore, competitors should refrain from including swearing in their music.

While freestyles are performed on stage to a music track, contestants are not permitted to leave the stage. They will be disqualified if they leave the stage before the end of the song. However, they can pick up a fallen yo-yo and continue performing. It is also forbidden to sit or stand over the stage during a routine. Additionally, the contestant cannot have an assistant on stage during the freestyle.

String cuts

In the first world championships of yo-yos, 196 competitors from 20 countries gathered in Atlanta, Georgia, from July 31 to August 2. Many of them were teenagers, which made the event seem almost counterculture. The yo-yo championships are a global event with multiple disciplines. Contestants use counterweights like casino dice or rubber balls. While some yo-yos are intentionally flung from the string, the magic tricks performed in these competitions rely on the magician’s timing and precision.

In addition, string cuts are not penalized in yo-yo tournaments. However, it is a requirement in the first two Divisions. In the second and third divisions, string cuts are not allowed. Contestants must keep their yo-yos in the proper position while performing tricks. A successful trick must be performed within the first three tricks. All tricks must be completed in order, or else the contestant’s tricks will be disqualified.

Discards

While Gentry Stein’s great routine won him the 1A World Yo-Yo Contest, there were many other strong contenders who were penalized for discards. World Champion Hiroyuki Suzuki and Marcus Koh both had discards. Ahmad Kharisma, Colin Beckford, and Ryota Ogi also had discards. The only two people who didn’t have discards were Anthony Rojas and Janos Karancz, who had incredible tricks and trick density.

To avoid disqualifications in a yo-y-yo competition, the judges are strict about the amount of time it takes to perform a trick. Repetitions or tricks with elements that have been repeated are not scored. Major deductions are calculated by the Co-Head Judges. However, there are a few exceptions to this rule. If the contestant does not complete a trick within the allotted time, he must add it back on the spin and re-wind the string. Otherwise, the throw is counted as a new stop.

Regulations for yo-yos

Competitions for yo-yos are held worldwide. Yo-yo competitions have five divisions: Open, Intermediate, Senior, and Over 40 Freestyle. These divisions are separated by age and type of yo-yo used. A Yo-Yo contest focuses on technical skill and performance, and there are also freestyle routines. Players perform a three-minute routine to music, and are scored on their Technical Execution and Freestyle Evaluation. Based on the latest contest placement, players are seeded into various rounds of competition.

Competition rules are based on scoring criteria that are standardized across various genres of yo-yo. In freestyle competitions, the judge will evaluate the tricks performed in a standard competition pool, as well as the player’s own unique style. An element that is difficult or risky will result in a lower score, as will a trick that uses a switch. A routine will have a full score if all of the tricks are performed flawlessly.